FACTORY SHUTDOWN NOTICE: TimeMachines, Inc. will have a factory shutdown from July 12 thru July 29. All orders should be placed ASAP to ensure shipment ahead of our closure. Backorders will be accepted during the shutdown. Shipping will resume on July 30. Tech support will have limited availability via email through this period of time. Thank you for your understanding and continued support!

Frequently Asked Questions

The TM1000A arrives from the factory with a default IP address of 192.168.1.15. Unless the network it is plugged into is the same subnet, entering 192.168.1.15 into the browser URL of the PC being used for setup will not access the TM1000A’s web page. If lost or fogotten, the default settings of the TM1000A can be restored using a jumper located behind the front panel of the TM1000A. See the documentation for more information on how to perform the reset procedure. The first step in this process is determining where the TM1000A is going to reside on the network. A static IP address is typically preferred. It should be assigned a routable IP address on the same subnet it is connected to. For example, if the IP address of a computer on the same subnet as the TM1000A is 10.10.4.71 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, then the TM1000A should be set to 10.10.4.X where X is a value that is not currently is use. Your IT department may be able to help with this. The second step is to change the IPv4 setting of the PC being used for initial TM1000A setup. Both the PC and TM1000A can remain connected to the final network during this process. In the network settings, change the adapter setting’s IPv4 address of the PC to something like 192.168.1.10, 255.255.255.0, no gateway required. Once that is completed, put the default TM1000A IP address into the PC’s browser, 192.168.1.15. The login webpage should appear. The default password is “tmachine”. Update the IP address, mask, and gateway to match what was determined in the first step above and save the settings. Return the setup PC’s IPv4 settings to their original value(s) and test that the PC can log into the TM1000A by typing in its new IP address. At this point, the TM1000A is available for use by other devices on the network.
The TM2000A arrives from the factory with a default IP address of 192.168.1.20. Unless the network it is plugged into is the same subnet, entering 192.168.1.20 into the browser URL of the PC being used for setup will not access the TM2000A's web page. If lost or fogotten, the default settings of the TM2000A can be restored using the reset button on the front panel of the TM2000A. See the documentation for more information on how to perform the reset procedure. The first step in this process is determining where the TM2000A is going to reside on the network. A static IP address is typically preferred. It should be assigned a routable IP address on the same subnet it is connected to. For example, if the IP address of a computer on the same subnet as the TM2000A is 10.10.4.71 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, then the TM2000A should be set to 10.10.4.X where X is a value that is not currently in use. Your IT department may be able to help with this. The second step is to change the IPv4 setting of the PC being used for initial TM2000A setup. Both the PC and TM2000A can remain connected to the final network during this process. In the network settings, change the adapter setting's IPv4 address of the PC to something like 192.168.1.10, 255.255.255.0, no gateway required. Once that is completed, put the default TM2000A IP address into the PC's browser, 192.168.1.20. The login webpage should appear. The default username is "admin", default password is "tmachine". Update the IP address, mask, and gateway to match what was determined in the first step above and save the settings. Return the setup PC's IPv4 settings to their original value(s) and test that the PC can log into the TM2000A by typing in its new IP address. At this point, the TM2000A is available for use by other devices on the network.
If you are having issues viewing/modifying information on the web page for your TimeMachines device please try disabling any antivirus protection that may be running on your PC. Once you have successfully viewed and made the necessary changes from the web page you may re-enable your antivirus protection. This will not cause any issues with operation of the device, only the ability to view the webpage.
The TM1000A does not have an internal clock source and does not serve time without a GPS lock. It is therefore a requirement that a continuous view of the sky be available to maintain its time serving functions. See the TM2000A for this added feature.
The ability to use the TM2000A with a Linux machine is easy. Follow these steps to point your machine to the PTP time server. 1)Install PTP daemon on your Linux machine. 2)Set PTP daemon config to Unicast. 3)Point PTP daemon to the IP address of your TM2000A Time Server.

Need a program to keep your system time accurate?

Download NetTime

Meinberg NTP

Browsers are not all equal. We routinely test with Chrome and Firefox with good results. Chrome is our most commonly used. Some browsers, such as Safari, have trouble with the Javascript that loads the values onto the pages into the edit fields, and for that reason is not compatible with most of our products. Linux browsers cause issues with the internal web server of the clocks and TM1000A. The TM2000A is not affected by this operating system difference. Some anti-virus software can block browsers from displaying the settings that populate the fields of the web pages. If you are seeing no data in the web page fields, check and see if disabling your anti-virus fixes the issue.
First of all, there is almost certainly nothing wrong with the clock. Blinking dashes, or blinking seconds and AM/PM indicators are simply a notification by the clock that it has been unable to get a response from the primary or secondary time servers that are setup in the webpage. Something network related is preventing it. Either the time source is in-accessible (internet based?) or maybe the DNS entries are not working.

1) Are there network link lights where the Network cable plugs into the clock?
2) Check that you can log into the web server at the IP address of the clock. This just further confirms the clock is functional, beyond just pinging it. You can determine the IP address by double clicking the button on the back side of the clock by the network connection.
3) Make sure your internet connection is working and available to the clock.
4) Replace the FQDN of the time sources with their associated IP addresses to remove a DNS problem and potentially fix something that has changed on the internet. For example, if using the default settings, replace TimeServer1 (maybe was time-a.timefreq.bldrdoc.gov) with 132.163.96.1 and TimeServer2 (maybe was utcnist.colorado.edu) with 128.138.140.44. Another good internet based time source is 158.69.2.23 (pool.ntp.org).
Generally signal strengths for the first few satellites in the middle 30's is required. Sometimes it can be less than this if numerous satellites are in view, but lock time will be longer. A window with a good view of the sky can yield signal strengths in the middle 40s. It is important to note that signal strengths vary through the day as the satellites move. Low-E glass coatings can also degrade or block GPS signals. It is best to try numerous locations when looking for final location to place an antenna. Outdoors with a clear sky view is always best.
This IP address is the default IP that many devices go to when DHCP lookup fails. The clock has assigned this as its static IP address and can be accessed at this address by using an IP address on the browser PC of 169.254.254.XXX-1. For example, if the clock scrolls 169.254.254.147, then set the PC to 169.254.254.146. Of course, if the DHCP server is down, maybe fix that first.
The short answer to this question is no. The time servers get their time from the GPS Satellites and maintain their accuracy with it. The TM2000A does have an onboard OCXO that will maintain time in the event of a GPS signal loss, however this isn't intended as "set it with GPS and then disconnect the antenna" kind of time source. The hold-over time is limited in the web page setup and accuracy drifts without the GPS signal. There is a white paper discussing the accuracy over time without GPS lock for the TM2000A in the documentation section. The TM1000A does not serve time without the GPS signal lock. And sorry no, the TM1000/2000 are unable to have their time set by any means other than GPS signal.
In some cases, yes. The question will be the structure of the building. If the building is a wood frame building and is relatively RF transparent, then the GPS antenna may be located near the time server. Metal and concrete structures are usually not RF transparent for GPS signals. The next best option is in a window. In the United States, a south facing window is best as the most satellites will be visible. The window must also be RF transparent for GPS signals. There are some "Low-E" energy efficiency coatings that will block GPS signals. A good test is to download an actual GPS app for a smartphone, such as "GPS Status" and see if the smartphone can get a lock in a given location, if it can, then the placing the GPS antenna in that location will most likely work.
The upcoming GPS Rollover will be happening on April 6th, 2019. TimeMachines is aware of the event and our GPS vendor has stated that they had implemented preventative action to make sure the date rolls over correctly. We are in the process, over the next few months, of confirming correct function internally and will post conformation once we have indisputable test results. If the vendor statement turns out to not be true, we'll release a firmware update to compensate for the issue. Please continue to check back here periodically for updates.